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Failure: Part I 'What is failure?'
Fail fast, early, but more importantly learn from it!
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Failure: Part I 'What is failure?'

User image Failure: Part I 'What is failure?'
Posted by Dylan Christopher, 1 year ago
Tags: failure, learning, success, guide, exams

Failure: Part I 'What is failure?'

In most areas in our lives, failure is encountered as an extremely negative experience.  It can cause a rise of painful emotions, often leaving us devastated, demoralised and unmotivated.  This can mostly be attributed to its arrival at the end of a process; usually after weeks, and sometimes, months of hard work.  The resulting failure can make it feel like it was all for nothing; or, does it really?

Firstly, let us understand what failure is.  In most areas in our lives, failure is: “Not meeting a standard, outcome or expectation of an action or process”.  This might be, not achieving a passing grade on a test, or alternatively, not meeting one’s own expectations.  Musicians experience this when their performance does not meet their expectation; musically speaking: wrong notes or rhythmical errors, hesitations, or in the worst possible case, a catastrophe (i.e. the music falls apart, in a way obvious to the audience). 

All of these experiences can be heart-breaking to even the most seasoned of musician, especially after a long period of effort and preparation before the performance.  The problem, however, is not the failure itself, but when and where the failure occurs.  If the first time a person fails at a task is at the end, when it really matters, it is a sign that perhaps they were not aware that their methodology was incorrect and flawed from the outset.

So, why does this happen?

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Dylan completed his music training with honours at Colchester Institute, where he studied piano with Australian pianist Lesley Young, and composition with British composer Dr Mark Bellis. While studying, in 2009, Dylan won Colchester Institute’s Canon Jack Award for Solo Piano adjudicated by Andrew Ball.  A composer, promoter, and advocate of contemporary classical music, Dylan joined the membership of Colchester New Music in 2014.

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